Which Sentence Correctly Revises The Underlined Section In The Passage

Which Sentence Correctly Revises the Underlined Section in the Passage?

Have you ever encountered a sentence in a passage that just didn’t seem right, but couldn’t quite put your finger on why? You’re not alone. Sometimes, the problem lies in the revision of a particular sentence. Understanding how to correctly revise a sentence can make all the difference in conveying your message clearly and effectively.

Identifying the Need for Revision

There are several reasons why a sentence may need to be revised. Perhaps the sentence is unclear or ambiguous. Maybe it’s missing key information or contains grammatical errors. Whatever the reason, it’s important to identify the need for revision in order to make the necessary changes.

The Correct Revision

After identifying the need for revision, the next step is to determine the correct revision. This involves considering the context of the passage, the grammar of the sentence, and the overall tone and style of the writing. By carefully analyzing the sentence, you can make an informed decision about which revision is most appropriate.

Summary

Understanding which sentence correctly revises the underlined section in a passage is crucial for clear and effective communication. By identifying the need for revision, considering the context and grammar of the sentence, and making an informed decision about the appropriate revision, you can ensure that your writing conveys your message effectively.

Which Sentence Correctly Revises The Underlined Section In The Passage

The Importance of Sentence Revision

Proper sentence structure is crucial for conveying ideas clearly and effectively. Revising sentences to ensure they are concise, coherent, and error-free is an essential skill for effective communication.

Redundancy

Redundancy

Original: The customer demanded the same product twice over.

Revised: The customer demanded the product twice.

Ambiguity

Ambiguity

Original: The student promised his teacher to study hard.

Revised: The student promised his teacher that he would study hard.

Vague Pronouns

Vague Pronouns

Original: He told it to go away.

Revised: He told the dog to go away.

Misplaced Modifiers

Misplaced Modifiers

Original: The teacher asked the class to read the assignment carefully by the end of the period.

Revised: The teacher asked the class to read the assignment carefully by the end of the period.

Inconsistent Tense

Inconsistent Tense

Original: The students were studying all night, so they finish the project on time.

Revised: The students had been studying all night, so they finished the project on time.

Unnecessary Words

Unnecessary Words

Original: The reason for the meeting was to discuss the company’s future.

Revised: The meeting was to discuss the company’s future.

Poor Word Choice

Poor Word Choice

Original: The children were very bad and misbehaved at school.

Revised: The children were poorly behaved at school.

Sentence Fragments

Sentence Fragments

Original: Because it was raining.

Revised: Because it was raining, we canceled the picnic.

Run-on Sentences

Run-on Sentences

Original: The student was very excited about the test, he had studied for hours and he was confident he would do well.

Revised: The student was very excited about the test because he had studied for hours and was confident he would do well.

Parallel Structure

Parallel Structure

Original: The committee members debated the issue for hours before reaching a conclusion and a solution.

Revised: The committee members debated the issue for hours before reaching a conclusion and solving it.

Conclusion

Revising sentences to ensure they are clear, concise, and error-free is crucial for effective communication. Understanding common errors such as redundancy, ambiguity, and misplaced modifiers can help you improve your writing skills and convey your ideas effectively.

FAQs

  1. What is the purpose of sentence revision?

    To ensure sentences are clear, concise, and error-free for effective communication.

  2. What are some common sentence errors?

    Redundancy, ambiguity, vague pronouns, misplaced modifiers, and run-on sentences.

  3. Why is it important to avoid sentence fragments?

    They make sentences incomplete and can lead to confusion.

  4. How can I improve my sentence structure?

    Read, practice writing, and seek feedback from others to identify and correct errors.

  5. What resources can help me with sentence revision?

    Grammar books, online grammar checkers, and writing tutors can provide support.

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