Which Of The Functions Graphed Below Has A Removable Discontinuity

In the realm of mathematical functions, discontinuities lurk, creating gaps and irregularities in otherwise smooth curves. Among these discontinuities, removable discontinuities stand out as glitches that can be mended, revealing the underlying continuity of the function.

Dealing with discontinuities can be a pain, like a thorn in the side of an otherwise elegant function. They can cause headaches when trying to analyze and understand the behavior of the function. But what if there was a way to remove these pesky discontinuities, restoring the function’s continuity?

The answer lies in removable discontinuities, a special type of discontinuity that can be eliminated by simply redefining the function at the point of discontinuity. This allows the function to regain its continuity, bridging the gap between its different parts and creating a seamless curve.

Removable discontinuities, like hidden treasures, reveal the true nature of the function. They expose the underlying continuity that was obscured by the discontinuity, providing a deeper understanding of the function’s behavior. By identifying and addressing removable discontinuities, we can uncover the true essence of the function, revealing its elegance and continuity.

Which Of The Functions Graphed Below Has A Removable Discontinuity

Removable Discontinuity: A Mathematical Analysis

In the realm of mathematical functions, discontinuities arise as points where the function’s behavior deviates from its otherwise smooth and continuous pattern. These disruptions can be classified into two primary types: removable and non-removable discontinuities. This article delves into the concept of removable discontinuities, exploring their characteristics, implications, and methods for identifying them in various functions.

Understanding Removable Discontinuities

A removable discontinuity occurs at a point where a function is undefined, but the limit of the function as it approaches that point exists and is finite. In other words, the discontinuity can be “removed” by redefining the function’s value at that point to be equal to the limit.

Causes of Removable Discontinuities

Removable discontinuities often arise due to:

  • Holes in the Graph: These gaps in the graph occur when a function is not defined at a particular point, but the limit from both sides of that point approaches the same finite value.

  • Algebraic Simplification: Algebraic manipulations, such as division by zero or taking the square root of a negative number, can also lead to removable discontinuities.

Identifying Removable Discontinuities

To determine if a function has a removable discontinuity at a point, follow these steps:

  1. Find the Limit: Calculate the limit of the function as it approaches the point in question from both the left and right sides.

  2. Check for Convergence: If the limits from both sides exist and are equal to each other, then there is a removable discontinuity at that point.

Examples of Functions with Removable Discontinuities

  • Function with a Hole: Consider the function f(x) = (x-1)/(x-2). This function has a hole in its graph at x = 2 because division by zero is undefined. However, the limit of the function as x approaches 2 from both sides is 1, so the discontinuity is removable.

  • Function with Algebraic Simplification: Take the function f(x) = (x^2-1)/x. Here, the discontinuity arises at x = 0 due to division by zero. But the limit of the function as x approaches 0 is 1, indicating a removable discontinuity.

Implications of Removable Discontinuities

Removable discontinuities have several implications:

  • Integrability: Functions with removable discontinuities are typically integrable over an interval containing the point of discontinuity.

  • Continuity of Derivatives: The derivative of a function with a removable discontinuity may exist at that point, ensuring continuity of the derivative.

Removing Removable Discontinuities

To remove a removable discontinuity at a point, redefine the function’s value at that point to be equal to the limit of the function as it approaches that point. This effectively “fills in” the hole in the graph and makes the function continuous at that point.

Conclusion

Removable discontinuities are a common occurrence in mathematical functions. Understanding their nature, causes, and implications is essential for analyzing and manipulating functions effectively. By recognizing and addressing removable discontinuities, mathematicians can ensure the continuity and integrability of functions, enabling further mathematical operations and applications.

FAQs:

  1. Q: What is the difference between a removable and a non-removable discontinuity?
    A: A removable discontinuity can be “removed” by redefining the function’s value at that point, while a non-removable discontinuity cannot be removed due to an infinite limit or an oscillating limit.

  2. Q: How do I identify a removable discontinuity?
    A: To identify a removable discontinuity, find the limit of the function as it approaches the point in question from both sides. If the limits exist and are equal, then there is a removable discontinuity.

  3. Q: Can a function have multiple removable discontinuities?
    A: Yes, a function can have multiple removable discontinuities at different points in its domain.

  4. Q: Do all functions with holes have removable discontinuities?
    A: Not necessarily. A function with a hole may have a removable discontinuity if the limit of the function approaches the same finite value from both sides of the hole. However, if the limit does not exist or is infinite, then the discontinuity is non-removable.

  5. Q: What are some examples of functions with removable discontinuities?
    A: Common examples include functions with holes, such as f(x) = (x-1)/(x-2), and functions with algebraic simplifications that lead to division by zero, such as f(x) = (x^2-1)/x.

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