Which Of The Following Is Written Correctly

Introduction:

Language can be a tricky beast, with its ever-changing rules and conventions. When it comes to the proper grammar of “which of the following is written correctly,” many people find themselves scratching their heads in confusion. But fear not, dear reader! This comprehensive guide will shed light on the subtleties of this linguistic conundrum.

Understanding the Nuances:

Before we delve into the correct usage, let’s address a common pitfall: the dreaded dangling modifier. A dangling modifier occurs when a dependent clause (a group of words that cannot stand alone as a sentence) is left hanging without a clear referent. For example, the sentence “After finishing the exam, the students were exhausted” is incorrect because the phrase “after finishing the exam” lacks a subject.

Which is Correct?

Now, let’s tackle the main question: which of the following is written correctly? The answer is:

  • “Which of the following is written correctly?”

This is because “which” is a relative pronoun that introduces a dependent clause, and the entire phrase acts as the subject of the sentence. The preposition “of” indicates the object of the prepositional phrase, and “the following” refers to a specific group of items.

Summary:

To summarize, the correct grammar for “which of the following is written correctly” is crucial for clear and concise communication. Remember the following key points:

  • Avoid dangling modifiers by ensuring that dependent clauses have a clear referent.
  • Use “which” as a relative pronoun to introduce a dependent clause.
  • Employ the preposition “of” to indicate the object of the prepositional phrase.
Which Of The Following Is Written Correctly

Which of the Following Is Written Correctly?

In the realm of written communication, proper grammar and punctuation are essential for conveying clear and precise messages. One common area of confusion involves the correct spelling of certain words and phrases. To help you navigate these linguistic nuances, we present a comprehensive analysis of commonly misspelled words, providing the correct spellings and highlighting the rules that govern their usage.

1. Accept vs. Except

Definition:

  • Accept: To receive or take something willingly.
  • Except: To exclude or leave out.

Correct Spelling:

  • Accept
  • Except

Rule:

  • Use “accept” when referring to receiving or taking something.
  • Use “except” when referring to exclusion or omission.

Example:

  • I accept your apology.
  • I will except the blue shirt from the order.

Accept vs. Except

2. Affect vs. Effect

Definition:

  • Affect: To influence or have an impact on.
  • Effect: A result or consequence.

Correct Spelling:

  • Affect (as a verb)
  • Effect (as a noun)

Rule:

  • Use “effect” as a noun to refer to a result or consequence.
  • Use “effect” as the past tense of the verb “effect” (which means “to bring about”).

Example:

  • The weather affects my mood.
  • The effect of the medicine was noticeable.

Affect vs. Effect

3. Allude vs. Elude

Definition:

  • Allude: To refer to or hint at something indirectly.
  • Elude: To escape or avoid.

Correct Spelling:

  • Allude
  • Elude

Rule:

  • Use “allude” to refer to indirect references or hints.
  • Use “elude” to refer to avoidance or escape.

Example:

  • The speaker alluded to the recent scandal.
  • The criminal eluded the police.

Allude vs. Elude

4. Compliment vs. Complement

Definition:

  • Complement: Something that completes or enhances another thing.
  • Complement: To express praise or admiration.

Correct Spelling:

  • Complement (as a noun)
  • Compliment (as a verb)

Rule:

  • Use “complement” as a noun to refer to something that completes or enhances.
  • Use “compliment” as a verb to refer to expressing praise.

Example:

  • The blue dress is the perfect complement to your outfit.
  • She complimented me on my new haircut.

Complement vs. Complement

5. Council vs. Counsel

Definition:

  • Council: A group of people assembled for advising or making decisions.
  • Counsel: Advice or guidance.

Correct Spelling:

  • Council (as a noun)
  • Counsel (as a noun or verb)

Rule:

  • Use “counsel” as a noun to refer to advice or guidance.
  • Use “counsel” as a verb to refer to giving advice or guidance.
  • Use “Council” to refer to the noun form of a group of people.

Example:

  • The counsel provided valuable insights.
  • The city council made a decision.

Council vs. Counsel

6. Discrete vs. Discreet

Definition:

  • Discrete: Separate or distinct.
  • Discreet: Prudent or careful in behavior.

Correct Spelling:

  • Discrete
  • Discreet

Rule:

  • Use “discrete” to refer to separation or distinction.
  • Use “discreet” to refer to prudence or caution.

Example:

  • The math problems are discrete.
  • The detective acted discreetly to avoid detection.

Discrete vs. Discreet

7. Emigrate vs. Immigrate

Definition:

  • Emigrate: To leave one’s country to live in another.
  • Immigrate: To come to live in a new country.

Correct Spelling:

  • Emigrate (leaving)
  • Immigrate (arriving)

Rule:

  • Use “emigrate” when referring to leaving a country.
  • Use “immigrate” when referring to arriving in a new country.

Example:

  • The family emigrated from the US to Canada.
  • The refugees immigrated to the US.

Emigrate vs. Immigrate

8. Enormity vs. Normality

Definition:

  • Enormity: Exceptional hugeness or greatness.
  • Normality: The state of being normal or usual.

Correct Spelling:

  • Enormity
  • Normality

Rule:

  • Use “enormity” to refer to something excessively large or significant.
  • Use “normality” to refer to something that is ordinary or usual.

Example:

  • The enormity of the task overwhelmed me.
  • The normality of the situation put me at ease.

Enormity vs. Normality

9. Hopefully vs. I Hope

Definition:

  • Hopefully: Expressing hope or optimism.
  • I Hope: A phrase expressing a wish or desire.

Correct Spelling:

  • Hopefully
  • I hope

Rule:

  • Use “I hope” when expressing a wish or desire.
  • Use “Hopefully” to express hope or optimism.

Example:

  • Hopefully, the weather will be good tomorrow.
  • I hope you enjoyed the movie.

Hopefully vs. I Hope

10. Its vs. It’s

Definition:

  • Its: Possessive form of the pronoun “it.”
  • It’s: Contraction of “it is” or “it has.”

Correct Spelling:

  • Its (possessive)
  • It’s (contraction)

Rule:

  • Use “its” to indicate possession of something belonging to “it.”
  • Use “it’s” as a shortened form of “it is” or “it has.”

Example:

  • The cat scratched its nose.
  • It’s a beautiful day.

Its vs. It's

Conclusion

Navigating the complexities of the English language can be challenging, but understanding the correct spelling and usage of these commonly confused words will enhance your written communication skills. By carefully following the rules outlined above, you can avoid errors and convey your thoughts clearly and effectively.

Video Write the sentences in the correct order