Which Equation Is The Inverse Of Y 16×2 1

Which Equation is the Inverse of y = 16x2 + 1? Delve into the Mathematical Enigma

In the realm of mathematics, equations serve as the language that elucidates the relationships between variables and unveils the underlying patterns of the universe. Among these equations, inverse functions play a pivotal role, offering a mirror image that uncovers hidden symmetries and reveals profound connections. In this exploration, we embark on a journey to discover the equation that stands as the inverse of y = 16x2 + 1, a function that encapsulates the essence of quadratic transformations.

Navigating the complexities of inverse functions can often be a daunting task, especially when confronted with equations that exhibit intricate structures. The equation y = 16x2 + 1 presents a formidable challenge, as its quadratic nature introduces a layer of nonlinearity that demands careful consideration. However, with perseverance and a systematic approach, we can unravel the mystery and unveil the equation that holds the key to its inverse.

Through meticulous algebraic manipulations and a deep understanding of function transformations, we arrive at the inverse equation:

x = ±√((y - 1)/16)

This equation represents the inverse of y = 16x2 + 1, providing a profound insight into the relationship between these two functions. It reveals that the inverse operation involves isolating x and expressing it in terms of y, effectively reversing the roles of the variables.

In essence, the inverse function of y = 16x2 + 1 unveils a mirror image that reflects the original function across the line y = x. This symmetry underscores the interconnectedness of mathematical concepts, showcasing how one equation can give rise to another through the elegant mechanism of inversion.

Which Equation Is The Inverse Of Y 16x2 1

Unveiling the Inverse of y = 16x2 + 1: A Comprehensive Exploration

Understanding the Concept of Inverse Functions

In the realm of mathematics, functions play a pivotal role in representing relationships between variables. The inverse of a function, denoted as f-1(x), is a function that undoes the original function. In other words, if we apply the original function to a value x and then apply its inverse to the result, we get back the original value x.

Deriving the Inverse of y = 16x2 + 1

To find the inverse of y = 16x2 + 1, we embark on a mathematical journey involving several steps:

  1. Interchanging y and x:

    As the first step, we interchange the roles of y and x, transforming the equation into x = 16y2 + 1.

  2. Isolating y:

    Our goal is to solve for y, so we rearrange the equation to isolate y on one side:

    16y2 = x – 1

  3. Dividing Both Sides by 16:

    To simplify the equation further, we divide both sides by 16, yielding:

    y2 = (x – 1)/16

  4. Taking the Square Root of Both Sides:

    To eliminate the square of y, we take the square root of both sides, resulting in:

    y = ±√((x – 1)/16)

  5. Simplifying the Expression:

    We simplify the expression inside the square root by factoring out a 1/4:

    y = ±√(1/4 * (x – 1))

    y = ±(1/4)√(x – 1)

The Inverse Function: Unveiled

Through this series of transformations, we arrive at the inverse function:

$$f^{-1}(x) = pm(1/4)sqrt{x – 1}$$

Exploring the Properties of the Inverse Function

  1. Domain and Range:

    The domain of the inverse function is the set of all real numbers greater than or equal to 1, i.e., x ≥ 1. The range of the inverse function is the set of all real numbers, i.e., y ∈ ℝ.

  2. Symmetry:

    The inverse function exhibits symmetry with respect to the line y = x. This means that if we plot the graphs of the original function and its inverse on the same coordinate plane, they will be mirror images of each other with respect to the line y = x.

  3. Horizontal Asymptote:

    The inverse function has a horizontal asymptote at y = 0. This means that as x approaches infinity, the value of f-1(x) approaches 0.

Graph of y = 16x^2 + 1 and its inverse

Applications of the Inverse Function

The inverse function finds applications in various fields, including:

  1. Physics:

    In physics, the inverse function is used to derive equations for motion, such as the equation for projectile motion.

  2. Engineering:

    In engineering, the inverse function is employed in solving problems related to fluid flow, heat transfer, and structural analysis.

  3. Economics:

    In economics, the inverse function is utilized in analyzing supply and demand curves, as well as in determining the equilibrium price and quantity.

Conclusion

The inverse of y = 16x2 + 1 is a function that undoes the original function, given by f-1(x) = ±(1/4)√(x – 1). This inverse function exhibits unique properties, including symmetry and a horizontal asymptote. It finds applications in diverse fields, such as physics, engineering, and economics.

Applications of the inverse function

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

  1. What is the domain of the inverse function f-1(x) = ±(1/4)√(x – 1)?

    The domain of the inverse function is x ≥ 1.

  2. What is the range of the inverse function f-1(x) = ±(1/4)√(x – 1)?

    The range of the inverse function is all real numbers, i.e., y ∈ ℝ.

  3. What is the symmetry property of the inverse function f-1(x) = ±(1/4)√(x – 1)?

    The inverse function exhibits symmetry with respect to the line y = x.

  4. What is the horizontal asymptote of the inverse function f-1(x) = ±(1/4)√(x – 1)?

    The horizontal asymptote of the inverse function is y = 0.

  5. In which fields does the inverse function f-1(x) = ±(1/4)√(x – 1) find applications?

    The inverse function finds applications in fields such as physics, engineering, and economics.

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